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So, you read Mary Meeker’s legendary “Internet Trends 2019” report, and your life forever changed.

Now take a peek at the “Tech Entrepreneurship – Trends 2019” Report.

Learn about:

  • where entrepreneurship is thriving
  • what VCs and Entrepreneurs spend their time on.
  • the new stats on startup funding.
  • who is really getting funding.
  • the most effective business models and more!

 

Future of Entrepreneurship Report 2019-CJ Cornell
 

What a wonderful repository of small business and entrepreneurship statistics and data.

The summary:

If you are a small business owner in the United States you are in good company. According to the United States Small Business Administration, there are 30.7 million small businesses that employ over 59.9 million employees. Small businesses (firms that employ fewer workers than the average for their respective industry) make up 99.7% of all companies in the U.S.

Small businesses may abound, but they’re not always built to last. In fact, nearly half of them fail after five years, making it important to study the statistics from the current environment to avoid making mistakes.

But this does not give justice to the breadth and depth of stats provided (wonderfully organized and presented, with great documentation of the sources). Check it out, from ZenBusiness:

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Startup Failure Rate and 80+ Other Startling Statistics About Startups

A great piece of research on startup statistics and trends:
Some highlights:

Startup Failure Rate Statistics

  • Incompetence, at 46%, is the most common reason why businesses fail, according to a Statistic Brain study.
  • The percentage of startups that fail after four years in the U.S. is over 50%.
    • CJ Note: see the details – so you can avoid the cliched, and incorrect meme: “90% of all startups fail”
  • 65% of entrepreneurs admit they were not fully confident they had enough money to start their business.
  • Of the startups surveyed, 58% started with less than $25,000 and one-third started with less than $5,000.
  • 71% of surveyed U.S. startups have successfully raised capital in 2018.
  • In 2019, 52% of U.S. startups expect their company’s next source of funding will be venture capital.
  • San Francisco and Silicon Valley account for 13.5% of global startup deals.

For more interesting facts and statistics about the startup landscape in 2019, check out SmallBizGenius’ comprehensive study and infographic.

Some highlights below:

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To get new startup ideas off the ground, aspiring business owners are faced with many options for funding, including bootstrapping (self-financing) their venture, taking out a short term business loan, or tapping into the boom of cryptocurrency by launching an ICO to raise capital.

An ICO gives companies the funds they need to operate by selling underlying crypto tokens in exchange for another form of cryptocurrency. Short for Initial Coin Offering, this method of raising business capital is allows startups to retain control of their companies and has little regulation, allowing entrepreneurs to see a significant ROI without facing red tape or restrictions.

Still, entrepreneurs should bear in mind potential disadvantages that come with ICOs, specifically that they bear significant risk of failure and can be expensive to launch. Small business owners should carefully consider the advantages and disadvantages that come with using an ICO to raise business capital.

To learn more about using an ICO to fund a new business venture, check out the infographic from Fundera below.

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Understanding the Startup Valuation Process (Infographic)

(special thanks to … Redwood Valuation Partners)

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As of today, Amazon says it’s a #1 bestseller ! (and I proudly can wear the badge) – Few feelings are better! Thank you all !! My next book is due out end of summer, and I hope it is even more useful to #entrepreneurs and #startups

 

#entrepreneurship

 

 

Entrepreneurs! Here’s a great way to have fun when sitting in meeting with a typical corporate customer, or even some potential investors, advisors and partners.

These meetings are, by design, not  with innovators or visionaries. Half the time, the participants utter the most predictable and inane comments. We see right through their attempts to appear helpful, savvy or superior — but it’s frustrating because you really can’t say anything. Until now.

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