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Read details about the book on the Launch Site or see it on Amazon

The Age of Metapreneurship is here! Get the book now!

Read details about the book on the Launch Site or see it on Amazon

The Age of Metapreneurship

The Age of Metapreneurship 
 by CJ Cornell 

With 100,000 how-to books, dozens of entrepreneurship programs in every city and an expert on every website – it should be pretty easy to become a successful entrepreneur. But something’s wrong.

Techniques and advice that were effective 5 or 10 years ago, will make you an amateur, today. The world changed. Technology and people changed. Yet the field of entrepreneurship hasn’t changed all that much. The old rules and the old mindsets are holding you back. In fact, the more experienced you are, the worse it can get.

The Age of Metapreneurship – is about the future of
entrepreneurship – a future that is just emerging now.
It’s about a new kind of entrepreneurship, and a new kind of entrepreneur …

Visit Launch Site

 


A special thanks to those friends and colleagues who read advanced copies, and were kind enough to leave some great reviews on Amazon.com:

… a funny, lively, informative book that examines entrepreneurship in a variety of novel and useful ways. A must-read, whether you’re just starting out in the entrepreneurial world, or been at it for a while.
This is a must-read for founders, business buffs and anyone interested in startup culture.
Well written, timely, and enjoyable.
(read more 5 star reviews)

Inside we’ll explore:

  • Chaos – Entrepreneurship is so broadly defined today that no longer know who and isn’t …
  • Cults – The institutions, programs, and leaders designed to help entrepreneurs, today are failing them.
  • Dots – Entire industries are ripe for disruption (by entrepreneurs) because the old business models are disintegrating. Direct, straight lines, are being replaced by ‘connecting the dots.’
  • Abundance vs Scarcity – and how ‘every abundance creates a new scarcity’ is the new business mantra.
  • Scale – is now a required strategy for every startup – otherwise you risk irrelevance: but scaling now can be far, wide, or deep.
  • Crowds change everything – crowdsourcing, crowdfunding and collective intelligence.
  • Movements – the waves of the network: Join them, start them, leverage them – or risk sitting on the sidelines.
  • The Paradox of Experience:  The more experience you have, the harder it gets.
  • Cultivating Meta-Value and your Meta-Tribe.
  • find out more …

 

THANK YOU for you help and support!
The Age of Metapreneurship debuted in Amazon’s Top 20 New Releases! 

Who should read The Age of Metapreneurship?

  • If you’ve been advising new ventures and guiding them through a bootcamp-like experience – only to see them sputter, and fade away, this book is for you.
  • If you see entrepreneurship in your region brimming, brewing, and percolating -but never seeming to gain critical mass, this book is for you.
  • If you’re an highly experienced entrepreneur embarking on a new venture, this book is for you.

The Age of Metapreneurship is like a collection of pieces to an unusual puzzle: Every time you put the pieces together, they form a different picture that is only for you.

 

 

Getting time and attention from experienced advisors is a rite of passage for the first-time entrepreneur.
Free Advice

Entrepreneurial advisors provide everything from informed feedback, market validation and technical direction, to introductions that can lead to partnerships, investors and customers.

Advisors are often former serial entrepreneurs themselves with well-earned battle scars from risking, failing and succeeding enough times to have sharp
insights into the venture building process. They have a special empathy for the struggling entrepreneur. There’s satisfaction in helping an up-and-coming entrepreneur avoid the same mistakes, and giving them insights that will help accelerate their progress.

Not all advisors have the right experience, and it is very hard for the entrepreneur to know which advisors can truly help their company.  It takes many first dates to find those perfect matches. But advisors kiss a lot of frogs too: Frogs, hunchbacks, maniacs, dreamers, neurotics – and I suspect a few psychotics. Entrepreneurs come in all sizes and for advisors it can be exhausting to try to help them all – particularly those entrepreneurs who don’t really want to be helped, or who are not ready for outside advice.

So, for the entrepreneur about to go seeking advice from advisors, here’s some blunt, very blunt, advice:

Continue reading »

 

I get bored and cynical every time I read a blog post from a first-time entrepreneur who has “discovered” the 7 amazing secrets to entrepreneurial success.  Usually their amazement is because they were so inexperienced in the first place, and some basic truths about business and entrepreneurship never occurred to them in the first place.  Much like how an 18 year-old living on their own for the first time is amazed to discover that ‘if you don’t pay your rent on time, the landlord will evict you.’ It’s an important lesson, but hardly an amazing secret that now qualifies them as an expert.

SFrustrated-PixleBayo many new entrepreneurs self-anoint themselves an expert because they’ve started out so clueless in the first place. Expertise is not measured in the difference between zero knowledge and what you have just learned – expertise is what you know more, or do better, than the majority – or better than other experts.

OK. End of that preemptive rant.

Now an exception.

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Brilliant and spot-on, as usual, from Scott Adams’ Dilbert:
 
Dilbert.com

 

 

Professor_Lucifer_Butts
Entrepreneurial and Venture Capital thought leader Brad Feld offered the following pearl of wisdom:

“I don’t want to see a powerpoint deck – I want to play with something. I don’t want to hear a description of what you do – I want to see a demo. I don’t want you to tell me your background, where you went to school, or where your grew up. I want to see what you are working on.”

via Getting Your Demos Right – Feld Thoughts.

While this was written in the context of wanting to see demos, the overall sentiment is equally valuable for entrepreneurs – particularly about investors not wanting to hear about your background, credentials and life story.

Personally, I don’t agree as strongly with the sentiment that the demo is the most important aspect of the pitch.   This all depends on the investor.

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Fragile Egg

 

I love reading Paul Graham.  Heck, everyone loves reading Paul Graham’s writings on entrepreneurship and investing.  The two best thing things about the Y-Combinator founder’s essays are:  1) They are intensely insightful – from his broad and deep understanding of the startup experience, and 2) They are indeed essays as opposed to the pithy, all-fluff-and-no-substance “5 things you need to know” posts that dominate the web – especially on the subject of entrepreneurship.

Below is a particularly insightful section from his recent “Do Things that Don’t Scale” essay:
Filed under the subheading,  Fragile:

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